Outbreak of Bacterial Kidney Disease in fish

The presence of Bacterial Kidney Disease (BKD) has been confirmed
in a trout farm in Devon. Defra has issued an Order under the Diseases
of Fish Act 1937, prohibiting all movements of fish

The presence of Bacterial Kidney Disease (BKD) has been confirmed in a trout farm in Devon. Defra has issued
an Order under the Diseases of Fish Act 1937, prohibiting all movements of fish to and from the infected Fish
Farm and Fishery.

The disease was found in a trout sample during a routine fish health-monitoring visit to the farm.
Fish Health Inspectors are currently examining the source of the outbreak and investigations are
ongoing. Whilst the disease is considered serious and notifiable under EU law, it is not widespread
in Great Britain and occurs only sporadically.

BKD has no implications for human health.

Notes to editors The Diseases of Fish (Designated Areas) (England) (No. 3) Order 2006 restricts
the movement of any live fish or live eggs of fish into or out of the designated area without the
prior written consent of Defra.

The designated area is All those waters and adjacent land contained within Waldon Fish Farm and
Fishery, Mill Leat, Thornbury, Holsworthy, Devon EX22 7AY. The farm is contained within the
following Ordnance Survey grid references:
SS402093; SS405093; SS402087; SS405087.

Further information on BKD and other serious freshwater diseases can be found on the Defra website
and in its “Combating Fish Disease” publication. Our sister site, www.efishbusiness.co.uk also
provides a wealth of information on fish health matters.

To organise a fish health inspection on suspicion of an outbreak, contact the CEFAS Fish Health
Inspectorate on 01305 206673/74

or by sending an email to: fish.health.inspectorate@cefas.co.uk

This new DAO will come into force on 15th June 2006.

Fish infected with BKD may display a number of characteristics including protruding eyes, a
swollen abdomen, pale anaemic gills and haemorrhaging at the base of the gills. Anyone
suspicious of a possible outbreak of BKD or have noticed signs similar to these, should
immediately contact the Fish Health Inspectorate at CEFAS Weymouth.

BKD can cause large numbers of mortalities in both farmed and wild salmon and trout. It was first
recognised in Atlantic salmon on the River Dee, Scotland in the 1930s and in 1976 there was the
first notable case of BKD in farmed rainbow trout. Whilst the disease is considered serious and
notifiable under EU law, it is not widespread in Great Britain and occurs only sporadically.